Skip to main content RSS Info Close Search
Feedback

Older Australians face a growing concern: do you know enough?

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has recently released data indicating that Australia needs to learn more about dementia

<p>Results from the Dementia Awareness Survey have been released and indicated that increasing the understanding of dementia would be helpful for Australians. [Source: Shutterstock]</p>

Results from the Dementia Awareness Survey have been released and indicated that increasing the understanding of dementia would be helpful for Australians. [Source: Shutterstock]

Key points

Twenty percent of surveyed Australians thought that aluminium cookware would increase their risk of dementia, despite this being a myth. While fewer Australians had this view compared to previous years, information acquired from the Dementia Awareness Survey indicates that some Australians still lack an understanding of dementia and associated risk factors.

Over 75 percent of Australians were aware that physical exercise and learning new things are good preventative measures for avoiding dementia, according to the latest data from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, with up to 70 percent of people with dementia diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Over 411,000 Australians are living with some form of dementia, according to the latest estimates from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Groups that are more likely to have a better understanding of dementia include women, people with higher levels of education and those who know someone with dementia. 

While avoiding polluted air can reduce one’s risk of dementia, only 35 percent of Australians were aware of this. Another study conducted by Monash University researchers suggested that certain neighbourhoods could increase your risk of dementia, including those with fewer green spaces. Read more about it in this article: Could your neighbourhood increase the risk of dementia?

To increase Australians’ knowledge about dementia, the University of Tasmania has released a free course, known as a Massive Open Online Course, called Understanding Dementia. The target audience includes health professionals, community support workers and people with loved ones living with dementia. 

The free course contains seven weeks of scheduled content and quizzes, with a certificate of completion available when you complete the course. It’s expected that participants will engage in around three hours of course engagement per week. 

If completing a course seems too overwhelming, reading shorter guides and articles can be a good way to increase your understanding of dementia and how it can affect individuals and their families.

Below is a short list of some helpful guides:

While reading about dementia can be helpful, other ways to help people with dementia can also make a difference in others’ lives. 

Raising awareness for conditions such as dementia is an effective way to get the conversation started about improving treatments and quality of life for those affected. 

Geelong Memory Walk and Jog was held recently, with over 840 participants who ran, walked or jogged to raise funds for Dementia Australia. A total of $140,000 dollars was raised in this single event, bringing the total funds raised in 2024 Memory Walk and Jog events to $1,668,256 dollars, as of April 30, 2024.

Dementia Australia Chief Operating Officer Anthony Boffa was happy with the result as he addressed participants at the 2024 Geelong Memory Walk and Jog event.

“[…] So many people impacted by dementia find these events a great way to connect with others in similar circumstances. It is such an important day and your support means the world,” Mr Boffa said.

Upcoming locations for Dementia Australia’s 2024 Memory Walk and Jog include Gold Coast, Melbourne, Perth and Uluru. For the full list of remaining locations, visit the Memory Walk and Jog website.

In addition to Dementia Australia’s events, WipeOut Dementia is an annually held corporate event that also raises funds for dementia research. Read more about these events in the article about how everyday Australians are making a difference in dementia research.

 

How do you plan to learn more about dementia?

Let the team at Talking Aged Care know on social media. 

For more information and news in the aged care industry, subscribe to our free newsletter. 

Relevant content:

Experts stress that financial help means independence for life

How a daily multivitamin dose may reduce the risk of dementia

The fallout from losing friends and how treatment tackles it

Share this article

Comments

Read next

Subscribe to our Talking Aged Care newsletter to get our latest articles, delivered straight to your inbox
  1. Fueling your body with healthy foods as you age could help...
  2. If you believe you have reached a point of it being too unsafe...
  3. Many Australians are aware of dangers related to extreme heat,...
  4. A new study published in Alzheimer’s & Dementia:...
  5. Our furry friends are more than just pets. They are cherished...
  6. The Department of Health and Aged Care will address the...

Recent articles

  1. After 10 years of distressed phone calls, the tech-xperts...
  2. What can health professionals learn from the clock-drawing...
  3. New research has revealed that talking through painful...
  4. As providers grow concerned about the new Aged Care Act...
  5. How many teeth should you have at your age and are dentures...
  6. What is a diversional therapist and what role to they play in...
  7. Fueling your body with healthy foods as you age could help...
  8. If you believe you have reached a point of it being too unsafe...
  9. Planning during retirement could help ensure you can afford...
  10. How important is palliative care and how can access be...
  11. How will older Australians benefit from funding allocations...