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Improving quality of aged care ‘central priority’

Improving access to quality residential aged care, reducing the stigma attached to dementia and increasing investment in research have been outlined as main priorities for Alzheimer’s Australia.

<p>National president of Alzheimer’s Australia, Graeme Samuel, has outlined to the aged care industry his three priorities for his term in the role.</p>

National president of Alzheimer’s Australia, Graeme Samuel, has outlined to the aged care industry his three priorities for his term in the role.

Speaking at the BlueCross STARfish Extravaganza in Melbourne yesterday, national president of Alzheimer’s Australia, Graeme Samuel AC, outlined to the aged care industry his three priorities for his term in the role.

Mr Samuel says there is a huge agenda to address in improving the quality of life and care for people with dementia in residential and community care.

“Possibly the worst day in my family’s life was the day we had to make the decision to place our mother into an aged care facility,” Mr Samuel says.

“I can empathise with the difficulties faced by carers and families who have loved ones in aged care facilities in establishing a genuine care partnership with staff,” he adds.

According to Mr Samuel, he remains confident that his personal experience in caring for his mother who had dementia has given him “invaluable insights” into the small things that matter in caring for people with dementia.

“The increasing number of people living with dementia, and reports of variable care for people with complex dementia care needs, give urgency to Alzheimer’s Australia’s call for zero tolerance for poor quality care,” he says.

“Quality residential care that is accessible to those with dementia is crucial if service providers are to achieve a level of service that meets the complex needs of people with the condition.

The annual BlueCross STARfish Extravaganza is a wonderful event which brings together the BlueCross community to celebrate ageing positively.

This event is held each year to coincide with the United Nations International Day of Older Persons and Victoria’s Seniors Festival.

The Extravaganza invites residents and clients to showcase their talents, sing, dance and prove fun can be had no matter what age you are.

Read Alzheimer’s Australia national president, Graeme Samuel’s, full speech

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