Skip to main content RSS Info Close Search
Feedback

Benetas celebrates ‘unsung heroes’

The contributions of hundreds of volunteers, including two long serving volunteers, have been recognised during Benetas’ 13th annual Volunteer Thank You Luncheon this week.

<p>From left to right: Benetas Chairman John McKenzie with volunteer Richard Gibbs and Benetas CEO Sandra Hills </p>

From left to right: Benetas Chairman John McKenzie with volunteer Richard Gibbs and Benetas CEO Sandra Hills

Benetas St Laurence Court Kangaroo Flat volunteer Richard Gibbs and Benetas Dowell Court volunteer Bernadette Millesi were both acknowledged for 30 years of service with the aged care provider.

Their efforts, together with those of over 400 other Benetas volunteers, were celebrated as part of National Volunteer Week.

“Volunteering for 30 years is an incredible achievement and we are truly grateful to both Richard and Bernadette, as we are to all our volunteers,” says Benetas chief executive officer Sandra Hills.

Other volunteers were recognised at the event for 25, 20, 15, 10 and five years of service.

In the past year, Benetas volunteers donated over 16,000 hours of their time, which is the equivalent of more than 2100 working days.

Ms Hills says the Volunteer Thank You Luncheon demonstrates the organisation’s commitment to acknowledging and thanking those who generously donate their time to support older people.

“We know that we wouldn’t be able to do the work we do without the very important service of our volunteers,” she says.

“They are the unsung heroes of our organisation; everything they do, whether it be sharing a cuppa with a resident, volunteering at the local op shop to raise much needed funds, or driving an older person living at home to a medical appointment, makes the world of difference.

“Their generosity is inspiring and plays a huge part in ensuring older people can enjoy a positive experience of ageing,” Ms Hills continues.

Spending time with older people or in the aged care sector is incredibly rewarding says Ms Hills.

“Regardless of the type of volunteering you undertake, you have the ability to make a significant impact on an older person’s quality of life.”

Share this article

Comments

Read next

Subscribe to our Talking Aged Care newsletter to get our latest articles, delivered straight to your inbox
  1. A new study published in Alzheimer’s & Dementia:...
  2. Our furry friends are more than just pets. They are cherished...
  3. The Department of Health and Aged Care will address the...
  4. As one ages, it’s a good idea to keep as healthy and active...
  5. Lutheran Services has become one of the first Aged Care...
  6. What would you like to see from the new Aged Care Act in...

Recent articles

  1. How does exercising raise funds for dementia research?
  2. The impact of visiting your local park could be greater than...
  3. Some of the roles of a nurse in aged care may seem unexpected
  4. Changes to the quality standards are proposed in the new Aged...
  5. In 2022 – ‘23, expenditure on aged care was approximately...
  6. New findings reignite the debate about surveillance in...
  7. Should you get the flu vaccine this year?
  8. A classic video game console has found a new audience in...
  9. There are genetic and modifiable factors that make people...
  10. This Easter, tightening connections could help combat...
  11. Improving your diet and increasing exercise could reduce your...