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Be a part of pioneering Parkinson’s Disease research

In what is believed to be an Australian first, impulsive behaviour in people with Parkinson’s is being studied at Curtin University, Western Australia, and researchers are looking for participants. Parkinson's is the second most common neurological disease in Australia after dementia, affecting an estimated 70,000 Australians.

Curtin University is looking for participants for a study on impulsive behaviour in people with Parkinson’s (Source: Shutterstock)
Curtin University is looking for participants for a study on impulsive behaviour in people with Parkinson’s (Source: Shutterstock)

Recent research has shown some people with Parkinson’s are prone to impulsive behaviours, (such as gambling, compulsive shopping, hyper-sexuality, excessive eating and excessive hobby engagement), more than neuro-typical people. Impulsive behaviours can have a significant impact on the person affected and those around them.

Although only a small number of people experience this behaviour, researchers want to help improve how these behaviours are measured. It is hoped this research will assist both clinicians and future research to more accurately identify impulsive behaviours in Parkinson’s.

Participants need to have been diagnosed with Parkinson's by a neurologist or physician and can be at any stage of diagnosis.

“The person doesn’t have to have issues with impulsivity to contribute as we need a broad range of people as possible,” explains lead researcher Leon Booth.

The research consists of a half hour questionnaire which can be completed in participants’ homes and a 2-hour session, ideally at Curtin University, where participants will be asked to perform different tasks.

It is hoped the research will help reveal what is happening in the brain when people with Parkinson’s engage in impulsive behaviours. This will help people with Parkinson’s access treatment if they need it, and contribute to the understanding of these behaviours.

If you are interested in taking part in this research or want further information, please contact Leon Booth on 0426217735 or by email: leon.booth@postgrad.curtin.edu.au

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